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Not One Sparrow: A Recollection of Peace Through Suffering

Posted by on May 16, 2017 in 2016-2017 Concert Season, Behind The Music, Blog | 0 comments

From Artistic Director Stephen Morton…   The process of putting a concert together can be a bit odd and selection of music for this concert began in a most unexpected way: the death of my dog, Eddie. The decision to put Eddie down was a difficult one. Truthfully, it was horrible, just as it is for anyone who has to make such a decision. But as is seemingly always the case, good came from it. Like most dogs, Eddie found his greatest pleasure in pleasing his master and when he became very ill and there was no hope of his recovery, I was determined to do what was best for him. He...

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The Rutter “Requiem” – A Chorale Member’s Perspective

Posted by on Jan 21, 2017 in 2016-2017 Concert Season, Behind The Music, Blog | 0 comments

Since joining the ACC, I have had the opportunity to sing many different settings of the “Agnus Dei” portion of the Latin mass text. Each one is unique in its own right, and I think to myself that each new one I learn is my favorite. I have experienced this again as I learn the Rutter Requiem that the Chorale and Orchestra will perform in March. This is not your typical Requiem, with English text and Psalms being interspersed with the Latin, and Rutter’s setting of the “Agnus Dei,” is, by far, my favorite movement of this work. The opening text is familiar: Agnus Dei, qui tollis...

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John Rutter on the “Requiem.”

Posted by on Jan 14, 2017 in Behind The Music, Blog | 0 comments

John Rutter on the “Requiem.”

Today, we share an interview series with John Rutter, a prolific composer and conductor. Born in London in 1945, Rutter founded the Cambridge Singers, his own choir, with whom he records and releases his own works. One of Rutter’s most well-known pieces is his Requiem, which the ACC will be performing on March 11 and 12. In this interview, Rutter “discusses the personal and musical impetuses which drove him to begin working on the piece: the death of his father, and an encounter with the original manuscript of Fauré’s setting of the Requiem Mass in the Bibliothèque...

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Ola Gjeilo’s “Northern Lights”

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016 in 2015-2016 Concert Season, Behind The Music, Blog | 0 comments

Ola Gjeilo’s “Northern Lights”

Today, we share with you an article written by Rachel Robison, a member and soloist of the ACC, concerning the work Northern Lights by Ola Gjeilo, which will be featured on our October 8 “Star-Made Shadows” concert… In every concert’s repertoire, there is at least one piece that truly connects with me on an emotional or spiritual level, or both. I mean, makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up and everything. One such piece the ACC will be performing on October 8 is Ola Gjeilo’s Northern Lights. Gjeilo, a young Norwegian composer is well­ known for his sacred...

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Morten Lauridsen …. about his Lux Aeterna

Posted by on Sep 29, 2015 in 2015-2016 Concert Season, Behind The Music, Blog | 0 comments

Lux Aeterna–Eternal Light–is an intimate work of quiet serenity centered around a universal symbol of hope, reassurance, goodness and illumination at all levels. This work formed in my mind over several years, and I began serious work on the piece shortly following the completion of Les Chansons des Roses in 1993. I put aside the Lux in early 1994 to compose the Christmas canticle, O Magnum Mysterium. The serenity and the uncomplicated and lyric style of O Magnum Mysterium are continued in Lux Aeterna, which is fashioned on texts from several different Latin sources, including the...

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The Music of Arvo Pärt

Posted by on Sep 29, 2015 in Behind The Music, Blog, News | 0 comments

Arvo Pärt grew up in communist Estonia, part of the former Soviet Union. His early modernist music brought him respect from the West but did not meet the approval of the communist regime. Pärt broke new ground in 1968 with his Credo. Credo was an abrupt departure from Pärt’s previous music which had become empty, dry, meaningless, even childish to him. Pärt considered Credo to be symbolic of his frustration with the neo-classical style. With its musical quote from Bach and religious text, Credo would never have been allowed a performance had the score not been hidden from the eyes of...

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